Highlights and Recording from 2021 Year in Review + 2022 Outlook Functional GI Trends Webinar

The GI community continues to work in unprecedented times caused by impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Patients have seen increased prevalence and flare-ups of GI-related symptoms due to increased stress and anxiety along with changes in dietary and exercise habits, while providers have had to navigate changes to the healthcare delivery model. As we wrap…

Breath Testing and Aerosol-Generating Procedures in Gastroenterology

GI leaders call for updated guidelines from industry medical professional societies for breath testing amidst ongoing COVID-19 concerns caused by aerosol-generating procedures (AGPs) Download Full Digital Copy of “Breath Testing and Aerosol-Generating Procedures in Gastroenterology”DOWNLOAD NOW As of early May 2020, the CDC listed aerosol inhalation as one of the coronavirus’s most significant ways to…

Breath Testing for Gastrointestinal Conditions and the Importance of Proper Preparation

How is breath testing currently used in gastroenterology? Breath testing in gastroenterology is a non-invasive and straightforward way for health care providers to diagnose common sources of digestive distress. This digestive distress can result from bacteria entering and proliferating the small intestine, producing trace gases not usually generated by the body. Having a higher level…

Understanding hydrogen and methane breath tests for SIBO and IMO: 6 Frequently Asked Questions

The North American Consensus on Breath Testing recommends using a hydrogen and methane breath test to detect Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO), abnormal growth of bacteria in a patient’s small intestine, and Intestinal Methanogen Overgrowth (IMO), excessive levels of methane in a patient’s intestinal tract. Both SIBO and IMO can cause various symptoms in patients,…

Hydrogen and Methane-Based Breath Testing

FODMAPs 101: What are FODMAPs and When to Recommend a Low-FODMAP Diet

What are FODMAPs? FODMAP, which stands for Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides, And Polyols, are groups of small-chain carbohydrates that, very often, are not wholly absorbed in the small intestine. The FODMAP carbohydrates, more specifically sugars and fibers, can be found in everyday foods such as: Fructose — fruits, honey, high-fructose corn syrup, agave Lactose sugar…